Category Archives: Inspirational artists

Goodbye Andrew Wyeth.

 

Andrew Wyeth has died.  He died in his sleep at the age of 91, at home.   

Christina’s World, Andrew Wyeth 

Andrew Wyeth, New York Times, Obituary 

 

 I began defining myself as an artist at the age of twelve.  Around that age, I started paying attention to living artists. Andrew Wyeth was one of the first artists I encountered, (I think I saw a print in an adult-friend’s study), and as a result I became obsessed with drawing, (line, form, shape and mass, perspective, space, proportion and scale, light and pattern).  I taught myself to draw everyday objects and local scenes, and as a result I learned to really look at the world closely – to really see.  I will always be grateful to Andy Wyeth for inspiring me to learn those basic skills.  

 Although I was impressed with Andrew Wyeth’s artistic skills, (much in the way you might be impressed with a musicians chops), what held my interest then, and now, was the emotional content of his work.  Whenever I have read criticism of Wyeth, I have always felt that the critic was missing the deeper content of Wyeth’s work due to arrogance or stubbornness or plain old ignorance.

 I believe that Andrew Wyeth is as modern as any artist of our time.  Criticism of Wyeth based on his chosen style, medium and content grows more hollow with the passing years.  Some of Wyeth’s work was quite abstract.  At times Wyeth was criticized for his illustrative skill, (and unapologetic use of those skills), and dismissed as a mere draftsman.  To me this has always seemed simple-minded and foolish.  I would never dismiss a musician based on his/her skill.  I think great art, no matter the form, usually involves both skill, (sometimes described as craftsmanship), and vision.  

 I can not imagine a world with only classical music, or jazz or pop.  And I can not imagine art with only one mode of expression.  

 Thank you for all you gave us Andrew Wyeth.  Rest in peace. 

 

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On Exhibit: The Permanent Collection, Crowell Gallery at Moore Free Library

 

If you find yourself in southern Vermont now through February 2009…please stop into the Crowell Gallery at Moore Free Library in Newfane, Vermont. 

                 The Crowell Art Collection, purchased and gifted by Mr and Mrs Crowell,                  is   is        is on exhibit every year December -February. 

You will find one of my paintings in this collection. 

Included in this collection are the works of some fantastic artists also associated with Vermont.  Below is the press release:

   

Newfane, Vermont

Crowell Gallery at Moore Free Library

Featured: Work by artists represented in the Crowell Art Collection — Clare Adams, Eric Aho, Barbara Comfort, Janet Fish, James Florschutz, Michaela Harlow, Mary Hermansader, Wolf Kahn, Mallory Lake, Emily Mason, Jules Olitski, Susan Osgood, John Ridgeway, Roger Sandes, Harry Saxman, Deidre Scherer, Johnny Swing and James Urbaska. Through February.

Where: Moore Free Library, 23 West St. Hours: Tuesday to Friday, 1 to 5 p.m., Saturday, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Contact: 802-365-7948.  

  

My favorite artwork in this collection is a GREAT piece of sculpture by the amazing

Johnny Swing

And a beautiful painting by one of my greatest inspirations, the talented

Emily Mason   

 

The snowy Vermont landscape is beautiful and seeing the collection is well worth the ride!

*A heartfelt thank you to the late Robert Crowell and his wife for their generosity* 

 

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Also posted in Exhibits, Uncategorized

In Memory of Grace Hartigan

Grace Hartigan died on Saturday the 15th of November, at the age of 86.  The New York Times released an obituary, with highlights of her life and career. Hartigan is an artist I admire for her bravery as well as her talent.  Imagine being reduced to tears by the likes of Willem de Kooning, and having the courage to continue! Is there anything more disheartening than dismissal? Thank you Grace, for not buckling when encountering an art-world bully, and thank you for giving us all the gift of your art. 

 

Untitled / (c) Grace Hartigan 

 

 

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